collection

Sunday, 26 March 2017

Rare Ian Fleming photo has surfaced


It was when I was scanning Ebay that I found a picture of Ian Fleming that I had never seen before.

The below photo is from an article about one of Ian Flemings mistresses in The Daily Telegraph that was on sale on March 18, 2017 in the UK.

 The photo seems to be from the time Fleming worked at the Admiralty as a Commander.

If any of you have seem this photo of Ian Fleming before then please let me know in the comments below.

You can buy the magazine online at Pressreader for only £0.99


Tuesday, 21 March 2017

How Tiffany Case got her name


Nowadays when there is a new James Bond film out all characters needs to be invented with very Bondish names. Something that Mike Myers has played with wonderfully in the Austin Powers series.
But the early films all had names from the James Bond books written by Ian Fleming.

Tiffany Case was the name for the girl in the 1956 novel Diamonds Are Forever.

And it is revealed in the last third of the book, when Bond asks her why she was given such a special name.
And the reason I got called Tiffany is because when I was born, dear father Case was so sore I wasn’t a boy he gave my mother a thousand bucks and a powder case from Tiffany’s and walked out. Joined the Marines. In the end he got killed at Iwo Jima. So my mother just called me Tiffany Case and set about earning a living for us both. Started with a string of call-girls and then got more ambitious. Maybe that doesn’t sound so good to you?’ She looked at him half defensively and half pleadingly.
In the world as of today parents seem to give their children all types of names. Especially names from Film and TV. But back in the 50's and 60's Ian Fleming must have been in a league of his own coming up with all these fantastic names within the literally James Bond.

Below is the cover drawing for the Scandinavian James Bond comic that was distributed between 1965 and 1995 by Semic Press. Many of them with fantastic scenes from the James Bond books. The below one is of course from Diamonds Are Forever that was titled Death Plays False in Sweden and Death and Diamonds in Denmark. Cover scan is borrowed from Bond O Rama.

If you wish to read Diamonds are Forever you can buy it at Amazon US here and Amazon UK here. 



Sunday, 19 March 2017

I own a piece of James Bond history, read and be amazed


I have bought something really amazing for my literary James Bond collection.

When Ian Fleming decided to start writing about SPECTRE and the villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld he did not invent the characters name. Just like the name for James Bond. He simply stole it.

Thomas Robert Calthorpe Blofeld was born on in 1903 and was at Eton at the same time as Ian Fleming.
According to the legend, Thomas was not a friendly person and Ian Fleming disliked him a lot.

Later in life when Fleming was working on his upcoming movie script that later turned in to his next novel Thunderball he decided to use the name for his school enemy as James Bond's enemy and head of SPECTRE. So the name went from Thomas Blofeld to Ernest Stavro Blofeld.

Thomas Blofeld is also relative to the British cricket commentator Henry Blofeld who was born in 1939. He is 77 years old today.

But both Thomas and Henry Blofeld were both book collectors and in silence they did indeed own copies of the James Bond books where there name was mentioned. But a few weeks back, these books were up fore sale and I managed to buy them for my collection.

So what is so special about these books? Well these books carry the armorial bookplate of the Blofeld family. In other words as a glued inlay the books carry the coat of arms of the real Blofeld family. And it do differ from the one that Fleming gave his Blofeld.

The Blofeld villain was included in the novels Thunderball, On her majesty's secret service and You only live twice. I own all three of these from the Blofeld family with their very own coat of arms within the books.

The fine armorial bookplate of Thomas Blofeld was designed by Sir Henry John Fanshawe Badeley (1874-1951), who was responsible for the design of many bookplates for the Royal Family and members of the Peerage.

This, I believe, must be the rarest books in my collection.

The Thunderball and On her mejesty's secret service Jonathan Cape are first editions but sadly the You only live twice is the second edition that says March 1964.

All three books are signed by Henry Blofeld.

Below is a picture of the bottom half of their Coat of Arms. I will not share the upper half or the signature in case any forger's will read this post. Off course I also have a receipt saying that these books come from the Henry Blofeld collection.

Here you can listen to a very strange sound clip of Henry Blofeld talking about James Bond.










Thursday, 16 March 2017

James Bond books sold for an amazing $40,123


Recently there was a big book auction in the US that offered a section of valuable Ian Fleming books. Below you can see the prices the books went for. Below is pictures of the actual books being sold. Maybe you have anyone like these in your collection. The entire Fleming collection fetched $40,123. You may click on each book to see a bigger version.Please note that prices include the auction house fee but not tax.
The Man with the Golden Gun. London: Jonathan Cape, [1965]. First edition. Octavo. 221, [3, blank] pages. Publisher's full cloth, gold lettering on spine. In a pictorial dust jacket. Spine cocked, extremities worn, spine ends and corners of front board bumped. Some soiling on textblock edges, adhesive residue and abrasions on paste downs, ink mark on front free endpaper, occasional soiling in margins, upper corner creased on page 17/18. Jacket foxed, toned and soiled, minor chips on edges, cello-tape repairs on verso of spine panel. Very good. Sold for $163

 You Only Live Twice. [London]: Jonathan Cape, [1964]. First edition, uncorrected proof. Octavo. 256 pages. Publisher's perfect binding in original printed wrappers. Spine leaning, wrappers rubbed with occasional light soiling, faint tidemark along fore-edge of front wrapper, joints worn, corners bumped. Preliminary and terminal leaves glued to wrappers at gutter, minor faint staining to preliminary leaves, occasional over-opening. Good. Sold for $525

The Man with the Golden Gun. London: Jonathan Cape, [1965]. First edition, uncorrected proof. Octavo. 221, [3, blank] pages. Publisher's perfect binding in original printed wrappers. Front wrapper worn with a series of small bruises, faint diagonal crease across lower portion; joints worn, small chip to foot of spine; corners lightly creased. Hinges discretely reinforced. About very good. I bid $1,025. Sold for $1,062

Diamonds are Forever. London: Jonathan Cape, [1956]. First edition, first impression, with "His friends called him 'Boofy'" on page 134. Octavo. 257, [1, blank] pages. Publisher's black cloth, diamond device stamped in silver and diamond pattern ruled in blind on front board, spine lettered in silver, in original pictorial dust jacket designed by Pat Marriott. Small blemish to lower-right of front board, upper corners softly bumped. Endpapers lightly discoloured from binder's glue with some minor corresponding foxing, hard pencil erasure to upper-right of front free endpaper with small bruise, small stains to lower margin of page twenty-five, affecting adjacent leaves. Jacket edges lightly worn, particularly at spine ends, with small closed tear at bottom of front joint fold, extending to Cape urn device on spine; rear panel lightly rubbed with two small splashes in author bio; spine panel verso faintly darkened; price-clipped. Very good. Sold for $ 1,000


Diamonds are Forever. London: Jonathan Cape, [1956]. First edition, with "Boofy" on page 134. Octavo. 257, [1, blank] pages, with pages [9-10] not accounted for in pagination. Publisher's black cloth, front board pattered in blind with central diamond device stamped in silver, spine lettered in silver, in original dust jacket. Spine leaning gently, front board slightly splayed, lower edge of front board softly bumped. Page edges and endpapers lightly foxed. Dust jacket with closed tear at upper edge of rear panel near joint fold, recently addressed by small tape repair primarily on verso but folded over to small portion of spine and rear panels; spine panel faintly darkened with small bruise between "Diamonds" and "are," rear panel lightly rubbed with some faint soiling, edges and folds somewhat worn. Still, very good. Sold for $1,750

Octopussy and The Living Daylights. London: Jonathan Cape, [1966]. First edition, uncorrected proof, with sixteen words of notes regarding layout in pencil to preliminary pages and four on the front panel of the dust jacket. Octavo. 94, [95], [1, blank] pages. Publisher's perfect binding in printed cape wrappers, in original oversized proof-issue dust jacket with inset box stating "Proof Only..." on front flap. Spine very gently leaning with some minor creasing, rear wrapper slightly cockled at fore edge. Minor small stain to lower margin of page 11. Dust jacket top edge lightly worn with some minor creasing, as expected due to size. Near fine. Sold for $1,250
 
Group of Five Books. London: Jonathan Cape, [1957-1966]. First editions, including From Russian with Love, Thunderball, You Only Live Twice, For Your Eyes Only and Octopussy. Five octavo volumes Publisher's bindings and dust jackets. Some rubbing on bindings, spines leaning, ink ownership signatures. Dust jackets rubbed, edgeworn, and stained. For Your Eyes Only has staining on edges and front free endpaper, bookplate and small abrasions on front pastedown. Octopussy foxed on textblock edges, preliminary and terminal sheets, and dust jacket. From Russia, with Love has light foxing on top edge, and ink marks in margins and underlining text. Thunderball has staining on front free endpaper. Overall, very good. Sold for $625


On Her Majesty's Secret Service. London: Jonathan Cape, [1963]. First edition, uncorrected proof, one of 500 printed. Octavo. 288 pages. Publisher's perfect binding in original printed wrappers. Wrappers lightly rubbed, front wrapper lightly soiled, spine somewhat creased and leaning slightly, joints worn, corners softly bumped. Text block lightly foxed at fore-edge with small splash at top, occasional minor over-opening. Very good. According to Gilbert, "The proof of On Her Majesty's Secret Service has more errors and required more amendments than any other Fleming title, both in terms of careless composition and poor spelling..." Sold for $1,062 


The Spy Who Loved Me. London: Jonathan Cape, [1962]. First edition, uncorrected proof, one of only 500 copies. Octavo. 221, [3, blank] pages. Publisher's perfect binding in original printed wrappers. Wrappers lightly rubbed with some minor marginal soiling, particularly near the joint of the rear wrapper; spine rolled, cocked slightly and somewhat darkened. Top edge of text block with slight discolouration near crown, small bruise to half-title page near hinge where paper folded back and was glued to page, likely during the binding process. Very good. Sold for $687

On Her Majesty's Secret Service.
London: Jonathan Cape, [1963]. First edition, limited issue, one of thirty-five unnumbered copies marked "Presentation," from a total limitation of 285, including 250 numbered copies, and signed by the author on the limitation page. Octavo. 288 pages, frontispiece after painting by Amherst Villiers tipped in. Publisher's quarter vellum over black cloth-cover boards with large ski-track motif on front cover, in publisher's plain protective clear plastic dust jacket. Spine somewhat darkened, joints softly creased with a touch of rubbing and a few spots of minor soiling. Mild over-opening to the first gathering. About near fine. Sold for $12,500
 
 Casino Royale. London: Jonathan Cape, [1953]. First edition, first impression, first issue of the first James Bond novel. Octavo. 218, [2, blank] pages. Publisher's black cloth, front board stamped in orangish-red with central heart device, spine lettered in orangish-red, in original first issue dust jacket lacking the over-printed Sunday Times review. Front board slightly soiled along lower edge, small damp stain to rear board at joint, spine gently leaning. Top edge of text block and free endpapers faintly foxed, page margins a bit browned, but pages still supple. A very good copy, housed in custom black clamshell case. Sold for $11,250 
Goldfinger. London: Jonathan Cape, [1959]. First edition, first issue, second state with blind-stamped detail lacking from upper-left portion of skull decoration. Octavo. 318 pages. Publisher's black cloth, spine lettered in gilt, front board stamped in blind with line-drawing of skull, gold pieces over eye sockets blacked in gilt, in original dust jacket. Front board lightly rubbed, spine slightly skewed, upper corners softly bumped. Occasional light foxing to page edges and endpapers. Dust jacket edges lightly worn, heaviest at spine ends and fold, spine panel somewhat darkened, light soiling on flap folds. Very good. Sold for $625
Thunderball. London: Jonathan Cape, [1961]. First edition, uncorrected proof, one of 500 copies. Octavo. [254], [2, blank] pages. Publisher's perfect binding in original printed wrappers. Front wrapper lightly soiled, spine leaning and a bit darkened, bottom of spine bumped, joints creased, series of small splashes to fore-edge of text block. Preliminary and terminal blanks discoloured at gutter from binder's glue, due to possible repair, occasional light over-opening, scant wear and small closed tears to page edges. Very good. I bid $1,750. Sold for $1,812


Live and Let Die. London: Jonathan Cape, [1954]. First edition, serif faint on the signature letter "I" on page 129. Octavo. 240 pages. Publisher's black cloth, Edward IV gold rose noble coin device stamped in gilt on front board, spine lettered in gilt, in original second issue dust jacket, (identified as third state by Biondi and Pickard). Front board bent near joint and slightly splayed, with three short ripples in cloth above coin device, spine gently cocked, gilt slightly tarnished, upper corners softly bumped. Occasional light foxing to edges of text block, blemish with small bruise at upper corner of front free endpaper from pencil erasure. Sold for $937

Moonraker. London: Jonathan Cape, [1955]. First edition, second state, with "shoot" corrected on page ten but other textual and printing errors present. Octavo. 255, [256] pages. Publisher's B binding of black cloth, measuring 194 mm tall, front board and spine lettered in silver, in original first-issue dust jacket. Binding lightly rubbed with few minor surface scuffs, rear board slightly warped, spine gently leaning. Page edges foxed with series of small splashes to fore-edge and small dampstain across the bottom edge. Front free endpaper and first two leaves as well as rear endpapers and two terminal leaves foxed; rear endpaper also soiled and stained. Sold for $3,250


Complete Set of Facsimile First Edition James Bond Books. Sheldon, CT: The First Edition Library, [circa early 1990s]. FEL editions, facsimiles of the Cape first editions of each of Fleming's Bond titles. Fourteen octavo volumes. Publisher's bindings, in original dust jackets and slipcases. Fine, in the original shrink wrap. Sold for $1,625

Sunday, 12 March 2017

Do you shower like James Bond?


One of the blogs readers sent me a very interesting article on how James Bond showers in the books.

In the first James Bond novel Casino Royale 007 takes no less then four showers and they all have one thing in common. They are very cold.
The below pass is from the beginning of chapter eight.
"BOND WALKED up to his room, which again showed no sign of trespass, threw off his clothes, took a long hot bath followed by an ice-cold shower and lay down on his bed."
Every time I read that James Bond takes a cold shower, or as they are later called a Scottish shower, I wonder why? I guess I wonder that since I live in Sweden and we have a very long cold period of the year were a hot shower always is preferable.

But in that article I was sent there is many good explanations on why you should take cold showers instead of warm ones. Below is some extracts from the article.

Hot water dries out your skin by stripping it of beneficial natural oils. It can even cause your skin to produce additional unwanted oil to compensate for the sudden dryness. Cold water tightens your skin and constricts blood vessels. This reduces the appearance of pores and reduces swelling and dark circles under your eyes. With cold water, your hair appears healthier and shinier because it flattens your hair follicles and allows them to better grip your scalp.

After a cold shower, your body reacts to the temperature change by trying to warm itself. Your metabolic rates increase and the body kick-starts its natural bug-fighting defense system with a rapid release of white blood cells. Studies by Professor Vijay Kakkar, the founder of the Thrombosis Research Institute in London, show that circulation is increased and the body ramps up immune cell production when exposed to cold water for short periods of time.


Cold showers can, however, increase natural levels of testosterone by up to 17%. Research shows that hot water exposure puts your reproductive system into cooling mode, dropping the testicles in an attempt to keep them away from heat. Cold water allows your boys to stay at a temperature more conducive to proper testosterone production.

According to a 2009 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, brown fat cells in study participants were increased up to 15 times after frequently taking cold showers. Wait a minute—fat cells were increased? I know what you’re thinking, but this increase in fat is actually a good thing. The body has two types of fat tissue—white and brown cells. White cells are the type responsible for love handles and the buildup of fat on the stomach and neck. Brown cells are packed with mitochondria, the energy center of cells, and can be burned for energy to keep us warm. When the body is producing brown cells at an increased level, we more easily reduce the build up of white cells that occur during a caloric surplus. In fact, that same 2009 study found that participant had the potential to lose up to nine additional pounds of fat per year by simply taking cold showers.

After reading the article I have started testing cold showers and it works quite good. They are more eco-friendly and you do wish to get the hell out of there much quicker so it saves water as well.

So shower James Bond style. Both your body and your children's children will thank you for it.

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Daniel Craig has something to tell you!


I received an email the other day from a representative at Omaze in the US that I was not able to turn down even if it has nothing to with the James Bond books. It is simply just a very great cause.

Omaze is a company that arrange once in a lifetime experience's for the common people using celebrities. People like you and me are offered to donate money to charity with a chance to meet that famous person that we so much adore.

And for the second time they are using Daniel Craig since he is the United Nations advocate and helps them reach out with their work.

This time the profits will go to the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS). Their task is to work with affected states to reduce the threat and impact of landmines and other explosive hazards. UNMAS coordinates UN interventions to focus on areas of greatest need and to provide education and assistance to people caught up in conflicts. Currently UNMAS works in 18 countries and territories around the world to both save and rebuild lives.

If you donate money you will have a chance to meet Daniel Craig and and he will give you the keys to an Aston Martin Vantage GT Roadster. The more you donate the bigger will your chance to win become.

You can enter the contest here!

And below you can see the commercial that he made with Omaze for this contest.

PS. And to make it clear. I myself is 100% sure that Daniel Craig will be back as 007. As both the producer and actor of SPECTRE he received a bus load of cash. EON Productions and MGM knows how bankable Craig is and therefore they will give him a breather before the next film and yet another truckload of cash to come onboard again.


Best of luck in the contest. Get back to me if you win and lets make a blog post about it!
 

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Get a bedside companion for only $2.49


Back in 1984, before Raymond Benson was a James Bond author he wrote the fantastic book THE JAMES BOND BEDSIDE COMPANION. The book was nominated for the Edgar Allen Poe award for Best Biographical/Critical Work in 1984.

Back then there had not been to many books on the subject like now. There were also no internet for fans to use so a book like this was much appreciated at the time.

in 1988 an updated version of the book was released with a fantastic cover design by Graham Rye over at The James Bond international fan club.

That version of the book was one of the very first I bought when I became a fan in 1990. and I spent hours trying to read the book since I was only 14 years old whit poor English skills at the time. It is actually books like this that made me understand English better and better and even helped my self-confidence grow so that I later in life wrote in English on a daily basis at work.

The James Bond bedside companion is a book that every Bond fan should have in their collection. It tells the story of both the books and the films. The book was almost like the blueprint for other books to follow in later years.

Now in the digital age the book is for sale as an E-book. The normal price is $4.99 but during this week (March 6 - March 11 - 2017) the book is at half price only costing $2.49.

I do not make any profit from urging you to buy this book. I just think its a great book to have in the collection.

You can buy your copy of the book here. 

You can also buy the softcover version at a very good price on Amazon US here and Amazon UK here

US First edition


UK 1988 edition 


E-Book edition 


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